Latest Posts

Photo From A Moving Car (Photo 1)

Well, have you ever been a passenger in a car and while riding along you felt total boredom. Yep, recently that happened to me. So I grabbed my Nikon D500, rolled down the window and started shooting at various shutter speeds. The slower the shutter speed the more sense of movement is shown in the photo. Yet when the shadow of your car is captured in the photo it is relatively sharp in comparison to the rest of the photo. This is panning in reverse instead of moving the camera, your camera is still yet moving at the same speed as the car. You can create a lot of cool effects doing this.

Both the photo above and below where taken from a moving car with the camera’s shutter speed at 1/8 of a second. The car was moving much faster in the black and white photo in comparison to the color photo. Give it a try sometime, it is fun.

A Quick Pullover

I learned my photography with the help of Kodak Film. Black and white photos came to life in my basement using Kodak chemicals. When shooting color I would use Kodachrome 25 or 64. I have fond memories of those days. I was discovering and  learning. And darn it taking a pic with film, developing the film, then creating a contact strip and finally an enlargement, fills one with great satisfaction and accomplishment. Doing that work is tedious, yet awarding.

In the days of film there was no instant gratification and boy, you really had to know the craft of photography. Mistakes were permanent and rarely did you have the opportunity to go back and retake the moment. I had to nail the photo and when it was all finished and I had created what what I had visualized the print to be, I would experience a creative high that would last for days. Today in the digital world I don’t experience that euphoria. It is all instant gratification and the feeling of happiness of nailing the photo is short lived.

Yesterday, I was thinking about all that while driving out of Rocky Mountain National Park. Photographically the day had been a waste. I had taken about a hundred pics that I knew were totally worthless.

I had already download the pics on my iPad and one after the other ended with delete. There was a few I kept hoping that with a second look I would discover something worthwhile in them that I had previously overlooked. Basically I just didn’t want to admit that on this day I had failed as a photographer.

As I got closer to the exit of the park I noticed in the distant four wild turkeys. What the heck, I pulled the car off the side of the road, grabbed my Nikon D500 which had attached to it a Nikkor 200 to 500mm zoom lens.

I jumped out of the car and looked for a clear view of the turkeys. They were about thirty yards away. There was no time to set up a tripod. I would have to steady the heavy lens and camera all on my own. Vibration Reduction was on. I quickly changed the focusing to 3D put the camera up to my eye and started shooting. I took about fifteen close up photos of the turkeys before they were out of view. About forty percent of the photos were okay sharp and about sixty percent of the photos were razor sharp. Amazing, I could never have accomplished this during my film days. Camera would have had to been on a tripod. I would have been more selective with the shutter release because each snap cost money. Plus the turkeys were moving quickly and sporadically so it is doubtfull that my manual focus would have kept up with them. I would of had maybe one or two photos in focus.

Note: the close up  of the Turkey’s profile is what I consider barely sharp.

Then I noticed some wildflowers to the left of where the turkeys had previous been. So for the fun of it I took a couple of snapshots of them. A couple of snaps ended up being about fifteen pics. Again even with a gentle wind swaying the flowers most of my pics were sharp. If I had been shooting film it is doubtful that I would have taken more than one photo of the flowers. As it ends up the flower photos were my favorite photos of the day and I consider them keepers.

Yep, once I got back to the car I quickly download the captures onto my iPad. I edited one flower pic and uploaded it to Instagram. On the iPad the pics I figure were good I copied into Lightroom. When I got home those same pictures were already downloaded into Lightroom on my computer. Now I can study them even more and possibly create something special.

Yes, instant gratification can be rewarding.

Fireworks And Being Creative

Talk about bad timing, I am about to write how to spice up your fireworks photography and it is about two weeks after the Fourth of July. Oh well, I am not in the practice of photographing fireworks so I didn’t have the photos to complement this article. This 4th of July a did a little photography during the fireworks show at Timnath, Colorado.  Now I have photos to share. So lets see if I can give you some ideas for next years fireworks photos.

If you have been serious about photography for more than a month most likely you know the tried and true method to get pics like this one:

It is a pretty and standard fireworks photo. Here are the specs: ISO 100, F-Stop 9.0, Exposure 6.2 seconds, lens a 16 to 80mm at 22mm. Camera on a sturdy tripod with a cable release. Of course all these setting were set in manual mode and the focus was also set manually to infinity.

Nice pretty picture. Throw a bunch of them in Photoshop and you end up with a fantastic photo that you can make a poster of a fun remembrance. Like this:

That is all find and dandy. In fact such fireworks photos make fantastic images and prints. Still at the time of the shooting there is more that you can do that can create some visually stunning and different images; Like this one:

Or this one:

To get these effects I zoom the lens in on the first one and out on the second one. Also on the second one I continued the exposure after the zoom.

You can also wiggle the lens for an interesting effect or wiggle and zoom. Here are a few more examples of the zoom effect:

I think now you get the idea just how easy it is to be creative with your camera when photographing fireworks. Back in the day of film we would do this sort of things and then have to wait a few days for the film to be processed to see if we were successful. Sometimes we were really disappointed. With digital cameras you have instant review so you know right away if what you are doing is successful or not. So next time when at a fireworks show be creative with a couple of shutter releases. It could be very rewarding.

Thanks for stopping by my blog. Photographer: C. L. Getchius For more info on camera setting click here.

Going to a Wedding

Last week I was with family fooling around at Garden of the Gods when I came across this scene. The bride and bridesmaid were hurrying to arrive on time for the wedding. It seems they got a little lost. Also the bridesmaid was doing everything possible to keep the white wedding dress from getting dirty because of the red dirt. But in the end all turned out well. Coming across scenes like this is just another reason to have a camera on you at all times. – Craig Getchius

Ahh Yes, Back In The Park

It has been over a month since I have had the pleasure of visiting Rocky Mountain Park. That is a rarity for me. The last time I visited the aspens were putting on a show with their fall foliage.

Now all that fall splendor is gone. The mountains are once again snow capped. The trees have lost their leaves. In the lower levels of the park I came across smattering of snow on the ground. Not much accumulation. Just a nice dusting of snow.

This morning the clouds blanketed the park. The temperature was in the upper thirties. Yes it was gray and bleak. Which was totally fantastic. I love overcast lighting. It brings drama to my photographs.

I was climbing around on rocks trying to get this next photo. It is a typical tourist pull off that for years I have been trying to create something different and interesting. This morning I used my Nikon D800, with my widest lens and used fill in flash to capture the above image and the image just below this paragraph.

This was a quick visit to the park. Thanksgiving is two days away. Still have shopping and other things to do to be ready for my favorite holiday. As I was heading out of the park I pulled off and took an aspen photo. Hey when you are in Rocky Mountain National Park you have to at least take one photo of an Aspen Tree.

Hope you enjoyed the photos.

Wishing everyone a Happy Thanksgiving. Craig L. Getchius

Dingle, Ireland, Midnight

Dingle, Ireland, fog, midnight and kind of a self portrait. It was like I was back in some mystical time. Yep, I'm an American and this summer I had the awesome opportunity to visit Ireland.

I loved the fog and how it surrounded me, engulfed me. I felt like I was in another world. A world of Sherlock Holmes. Yes, I know the fictional world of Holmes took place for the most part in London England. But hey, I got a pretty active imagination. Fog, the light from the street lamps, the old buildings, the narrow streets the famous Irish walls all gave me the sense of being in another time. A time without cell phones, without automobiles, without television. A simpler time of daily living without the complex nature of our computerized, industrialized society.

It's funny how the little events in ones life can produce everlasting memories. Holding my wife's hand and together walking the streets of Dingle late at night is a memory I will always cherish.

I'm so lucky to have this memory and this photograph that will always bring back the emotions of the moment.

That is the essence of photography. It doesn't have to be the perfect photo. Photography can capture the moment and in so doing preserve the memories of that moment for ever and ever.

I captured this little moment of my life with my Fujifilm X-T1 and a 35mm lens.

Thank you for letting me share with you this moment of time in my life. Craig Getchius

Snapshots in Rocky Mountain National Park

This Fall I have not had the opportunity to spend much time in Rocky Mountain National Park. Yep, that is a bummer. Nevertheless I have manage to capture a couple of moments that will give the reader a sense of the beauty of the park this time of year. Hope you enjoy the photos.

If you are curious the photo equipment I used for these shots is listed here:

Cameras: Nikon D800, Nikon D5500 and the Fujifilm X-T1

Lens: Nikkor AF-S 70-200mm, Nikkor AF-S 24-70mm and the XF-35mm 2.0

Since I didn't have much time I elected not to use a tripod. All photos were taken handheld.

Thank you for stopping by my blog. In the next couple of days I'll be doing a lot of photography in the Rocky Mountain National Park Area. Hope to have some keepers that I will be able to share on this blog. Photographer: Craig Getchius

Back in the blog biz

After a long time of neglecting my blog I’m back at it. A lot has been happening in my photographic life and I am rather mad at myself for not sharing with the world my photographic experiences. Also, I have been contemplating the state of photography and hopefully will soon put those thoughts down for others to think over.

For now though saying I’m back and giving a brief glimpse into what I have been doing will just have to do. Also it should be noted I’m trying a new workflow with my blog. I’m using the App Ulysses to write this and from within the app I can post directly to my blog. If this works it sure is going to be nice. Here is the link to Ulysses: http://ulyssesapp.com/

Just got back from Ireland. Which of course was a total blast. Told you a lot has been going on in my life.  I traveled light, leaving all my Nikon gear at home and traveling just with my Fujifilm cameras. Don’t get me wrong I still love my Nikon cameras it is just in this case, traveling light and overseas the Fuji’s were a better fit. More about that at a later time.

The photo of the boat in Dingle Bay was taken with my Fujifilm X-T1. I love that camera. More later.  Thanks for stopping by. CLG